Rose In June

2014
06.30

Jon simply attributes his source for this moving epic as Louis Killen thus, “Lou Killen’s calling card. Reproduced here with deference to the master.” This thread from mudcat again has the lyrics and source information, which seems to indicate that this has crossed the Atlantic from Newfoundland.

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17 Responses to “Rose In June”

  1. Danny Dove says:

    What an increidble song! It came as a total surprise because I was expecting a different “Rose in June” but I much orefer this one. Thanks again, Jon.

  2. edith lewis says:

    What a great song.

  3. Lovely stuff once again.

  4. Jane Ramsden says:

    Wow! The Perfect Storm! That shivered mi’ timbers! I was expecting a different Rose In June too, but that was stunning! What a song to sing in the Methodist Halls, where so many folk songs have had their airing… and still do! I’m blown away!

  5. Grandad7 says:

    I too thought this was going to be Rosebud in June (perhaps Jon will include his version later) what a pleasant surprise though another good song and what a great project. Thank You Jon

  6. John Phipps says:

    Incredible. Even though I prefer Gregorian chant I wish I could sing this at my Church as this is a cut above what I am given to sing. I envy the Methodist and their SATB singing. I am grateful to Mike Harding for advertising this.

    I am hoping some of the songs from Larkrise to Candleford might be included. Jacob’s Well and Dare to Be a Daniel come to mind though Abroad for Pleasure is probably more stylistically in line with what I have heard so far though this misses the call and response structure.

  7. Sophie says:

    Gosh, brought a bit of a tear to my eye!

  8. Jan Howard says:

    This really moved me. I think Jon sings this wonderfully well. powerful, passionate, prayer not performance. This sort of authority is a hard trick to pull in our secular society. I would like to know more about it’s origins.

  9. Matthew Edwards says:

    Thanks Jon, for singing this extremely powerful song. The combination of a ballad with a hymn gives it a really dramatic effect. Singing one song at a time really allows each song to stand out on its own merits.

    The story behind the song is worth discovering, and I’ve added the basic information to the Mudcat thread, but here is the report from the Dundee Courier & Argus 18 December 1872.

    “LOSS OF A FISHING BOAT AT ELIE
    TWO MEN DROWNED
    During the gale early yesterday morning, a number of the fishing boats belonging to the East Coast ports, ran to the port of Elie for shelter. About one o’clock in the morning, while the fishing boat Rose in June was taking the harbour, she struck on the rock at the back of the granary, and shortly afterwards foundered. The crew, six in number, clung to the boat, which drifted along the back of the pier, but although the coastguardsmen and a number of fishermen observed the accident, they were then unable to render any assistance. About an hour after the boat struck, she was driven up near to the beach, where a number of fishermen and coastguardsmen succeeded in wading into the surf, and by means of lifebelts, &c, landed four of the crew in a very exhausted condition. The skipper of the boat, named Andrew Davidson, aged thirty-five, and who leaves a widow and three children, and another man named John Allan, aged twenty-two, and unmarried, were washed from the boat shortly after she struck, and were drowned. Neither of the bodies have yet been recovered.”

    The Dundee Courier reported next day, 19 December, that the bodies had since been recovered;- “The bodies were carted home to St Monance immediately on being found.”

    Matthew

  10. admin says:

    Matthew typo amended and thanks very much for that. Tragic though this is it’s great to see the history and to imagine how it would have been turned to song out of respect and grief. It’s odd that the song itself seems to be from across the Atlantic rather than Scottish (or at least that’s what the Mudcat link suggest.)

  11. Jane Ramsden says:

    Still a ‘timber-shiverer’ a year after first hearing, but it’s your singing, Jon, that sends the shivers down the spine.

  12. What a really amazing piece of writing!!

  13. Old Muzza(NW Surrey-UK) says:

    A powerful song………well written, sad story…….great rendition…………
    but it seems to indicate that all those Hallelulias fell on deaf ears.

  14. Diana says:

    Beautifully sung and a lovely although sad song – I do like songs with historical facts.

  15. Diana says:

    Muzza have left a message for you on Jane’s wall. Please read.

  16. Jane Ramsden says:

    Possibly my favourite previously-unknown song from AFSAD, up there with ‘Sea Coal’ by sheer virtue of the power of the voice ref the power of the sentiments.

    If one is of a religious mind, you’d have to say God moves in mysterious ways, though the ‘hallelujahs’ came from the crew as they recognised they were about to die and meet their Maker, not at that point a plea to be otherwise ‘saved.’

    Having said that, 4 survived and 2 perished, the captain going down with his boat. T’is another case of the Titanic bandleader, Wallace Hartley’s ‘Nearer My God To Thee’ with partial victory to the Old Grey Widow Maker.

    IMHO, Jon’s singing of this is one of his best ‘timber-shiverers’ of the whole project. Not a dry eye in the house.

  17. Linda says:

    Todays the day Revival CD, Didn’t they look smart on Sunday morning! Love the bracers Sam!
    Love todays song can’t find the Louis Killen version on CD ……… Jane?

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